Nearby Attractions

  • All
  • Archeology
  • WildLife
  • Memorial
  • Nature
  • History
  • Art & Craft
  • Relegion
  • Other

Dholavira

Dholavira

Dholavira

Rustic, beautiful and charming, Dholavira is a popular weekend gateways in Gujarat for people seeking peace and thrill. With such unique geographic location, Dhelovira is a paradise on the earth. Located 250 km away from the Bhuj district, near Khadir bet in the great Rann of Kutch of Gujarat, Dholavira is an ancient town that contains the fascinating and historic ruins of the Indus Valley Civilization. Locally called Kotada timba, the site is the second largest Harappan site in India and fifth largest in Indian sub-continent. Amongst the Harappan sites discovered so far, Dholavira is the only place that marks the presence of Harappan culture from 2900 BC to 1500 BC. Lying on Khadir Island in the Rann of Kutch, Dhalovira covers an area of about 100 hectares. The ancient settlement is embraced by two monsoon channels, namely, the Manhar and Mansar. Dholavira reveals evidence of a remarkable planned city with broad roads, containing a central citadel (where the rulers or high officials stayed), a middle town with a spacious dwelling, a lower town with markets. Somewhere like other Indus Valley civilization town, Dholavira fortification was also in the form of a parallelogram. Archeologist even believes that the five-thousand-year-old town must have been a lovely city of lakes during the heyday. In fact, the residents of Dholavira had settled the town between two water streams, Manhar and Mansar, collecting their water in monsoon and using it for rest of the year. Made of sun-dried mud bricks and stone, buildings in the region still stand in good condition. With such amazing architecture, one can figure out that good civil engineers were appointed to make the town. The city was also an important trading point as here one can see the presence of large reservoirs and a dam reflecting the existence of a sophisticated system of water harvesting. In fact, as per some news release in 2014, 5,000-year-old stepwell has been found in Dholavira, which is three times bigger than the Great Bath at Mohenjo Daro. 73.4m long, 29.3m wide, and 10m deep, the reservoir represents largest, grandest, and the best furnished ancient reservoirs discovered so far in the country. The city seems important during the Indus Valley days as excavations have found evidence of seven layers, indicating as many settlements over a period of 1500 years. Archaeologists have identified seven different stages in the city design. The most interesting aspect of Dholavira is the inscriptions, mainly, ten large signs that are the first evidence of the written language. What attracts the attention of the people to Dholavera is that the place provides insight into the pioneering Harappan mind, with the world's best water conservation system, first sign boards, and ancient Indus scripts. In the year 1967, people of the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) unearthed the area. Artefacts include terracotta pottery, beads, gold and copper ornaments, seals, fish hooks, animal figurines, tools, urns, and vessels that indicate trade links with lands were also dug out from this place. All these items and article are now displayed in the museum, which is located at the entrance of the city.

Siyat Caves

Siyat Caves

Siyat Caves

Siyot Caves are one of the oldest Buddhist Caves with many encrypts and animal figures on wall. The site is not maintained well and is in bad condition. This place is archeologically important and don't forget to see the ancient step well just before the entrance to caves. The way to siyot caves is very complicated and last stretch is of metalled road, better take a local experienced driver with you, who knows all the ways. Over all it is worth visiting siyot caves with short duration visit your camera and outdoor shoes.

Surkotada

Surkotada

Surkotada

Surkotada is a small, 3.5 acre site northeast of Bhuj, in Gujarat. "The mound has an average height of five-to-eight metres (east-to-west) and was discovered by the author during the course of his explorations in Kutch in December, 1964," writes Jagat Pati Joshi in Excavation at Surkotada and Exploration in Kutch. "At the time of its discovery, the mound at Surkotada appeared to be a potential site with not only its available rubble fortifications exposed at places on the surface itself but also having an adjacent lower area yielding Harappan and other pottery and antiquities. He continues: "The excavations at Surkotada have been significantly rewarding in unfolding a sequence of three cultural sub-periods well-within the span of Harappan chronology and this fact has been attested to by the C-14 dating, i.e. circa 2300 B.C. to 1700 B.C. . .. The Harappans had a fortified citadel and residential annexe in Period IA and the same pattern of settlement had been maintained through the successive sub-periods IB and IC." "Almost all the [Harappan] pottery shapes were in conformity with the material available at other Harappan sites." "The entrances in the southern and southeastern sides in the citadel and residential annexe respectively are just simply openings of moderate dimensions without any architectural embellishment." "At Surkotada, throughout, a compact citadel and residential annexe complex has been found, but no city complex has been unearthed." Jagat Pati Joshi, Excavation at Surkotada and Exploration in Kutch, Archaeological Survey of India, 1990, pp. 14-18. 1. Surkotada: reconstructed image of the citadel and lower town. Computer illustration: Sushil Misal. Civilization in India: New Discoveries, Ed. Dilip K. Chakrabarti, p. 12. Computer Illustration by Sushil Mithal. 2. Distant View of the excavated remains from south. Joshi, Surkotada, Pl. VI. 3. Surkotada: stone structure in mound. Photograph DPA/Milind A. Ketkar. 4. Rampart of Successive Periods (Outer). Joshi, Surkotada, Pl. VIII.

Chari Dhand

Chari Dhand

Chari Dhand

The Chhari Dhand Conservation Reserve is a legally protected wetland conservation reserve situated at the dry grasslands of Banni and the marshy salt flats at the Rann of Kutch. Chhari means 'salt affected' and dhand refers to 'shallow wetlands'. This wetland gets marshy only during good monsoon receiving water from rivers nearby. The reserve is spread over 80kms of land. The Chhari Dhand is a paradise for bird-watchers and ornithologists as the land has around 370 species of birds, among which water fly, waders and larks can be easily spotted.

Bustard Sanctuary

Bustard Santuary

Bustard Santuary

By the law of probability, one has the best possibility and chances of spotting India's heaviest bird, great Indian bustard, at the extensive grasslands of Kutch. Also known as the Lala-Parijan sanctuary; it was declared a sanctuary in July 1992 to safeguard the Great Indian Bustard. Tourists who visit the Kutch Bustard Sanctuary get bowled over by the exquisiteness of nature. Sprawling over an area of 2 square kilometres, the sanctuary is the second largest conservator of the Indian Bustard, the largest being Desert National Park in the neighbouring state of Rajasthan. Other than the Great Indian Bustard, birds that are found flying around the sanctuary are McQueen's Bustard, Lesser Florican, Stoliczkas, Bushchats, Merlins. Varied vegetation, semi-arid grasslands and marshy swamps make Kutch Bustard Sanctuary an ideal home for Great Indian Bustard.
Animals and Birds spotted
here:Chinkaras, jungle cats, Nilgai, harriers, common cranes, black partridges (local name: kalo tetar), sand grouses, black and grey francolin, spotted and Indian sandgrouse, quails, larks, shrikes, coursers, plovers, Stoliczka's bushchat, white-naped tit, flamingos, herons, egrets, sandpipers. Coverage Area: 2 sq.kms Established: 1992 Best Time to Visit: October to March

Wild as Sanctuary

Wild as Santuary

Wild as Santuary

Located in an area called Little Run of Kutch, the Wild Ass Sanctuary in Kutch is the only home to wild ass in India. The sanctuary was set up in 1973 with a purpose to protect the endangered Indian wild ass. Sprawling over an area of 5000 square kilometers of the Little Rann and covering a minor portion of the cities like Sundernagar, Rajkot, Patan, Banaskantha and Kutch district, the wild ass sanctuary is the largest wildlife sanctuary in Gujarat. Indian Wild Ass (Equus hemionus khur), commonly known as the ghudkhar, still exists in this sanctuary. Akin to the Tibetan kiang, the ghudkhar are distinguished by a dark stripe along its back. Known for its speed, the wild ass lives in herds led by stallions and survived by migrating between the grassy 'bets' through the season, in search of food. There are around 3000 wild asses in the sanctuary and can be best seen in and around October and November. Other than the wild ass, the sanctuary is home to 32 other type of mammals including chinkara(Indian gazelle), two types of Desert Fox (Indian and White-footed), Jackals, Caracals, Nilgais (the largest antelope of Asia), Indian Wolves, Blackbucks, and Striped Hyenas. Every year, the Wild Ass Sanctuary attracts 75000 birds, including some migratory birds as well. The sanctuary is also refugee to some migratory birds like Sandgrouses, Desert Wheatears, Ten Species of Lark, the White-Browed Bulbul, Indian Coursers, Stoneplovers, Shrikes, Ducks, Geese, Ibis, Spoonbills, Godwits, Stints, Sandpipers, Shanks, Moorhens, Saras Cranes, both Indian Flamingoes, and Pelicans. The sanctuary also houses 93 species of invertebrates, including species like crustaceans, insects, molluscs, spiders, annelids and zooplanktons. Also, the sanctuary is home to a sizeable population of Rabari and Bharwad tribes. To experience the best of the wildlife sanctuary, one should go for a jeep safari tour. It is to be noted that the Wild Ass Sanctuary has one of the largest salt pans in India. Tourists who are visiting the sanctuary can book their stay in the resorts and hotels nearby the sanctuary. Day safari from Dhrandadhra, Zainabad and Dasada are provided by the resort. Wild Ass Sanctuary is no less than an empyrean for the tourists, needless to say- of all kinds!

Kutch Museum

Kutch Museum

Kutch Museum

Located in the heart of the Bhuj district, Kutch Museum is one of the oldest museums of Gujarat. Museum was established in 1877 as School of Arts by Maharao Sir Khengarji III. The present structure of the Kutch Museum was built to exhibit the wedding gifts of Maharao Sir Khengarji III, then it was known as the Fergusson Museum. The stunning building of the museum is constructed in a typical Italian Gothic style of architecture by the mistris of Kutch under the supervision of state Gaidher - Jairam Ruda Gajdhar. There are 11 major galleries in the museum namely picture gallery, anthropological section, archaeological section, textiles section, weapons section, music instruments section, shipping section, and stuffed animals section. Also, there is a section devoted to the tribal community where one can see ancient artifacts, folk arts, and crafts and information about tribal people, who are a major part of Kutch's history and culture. The building of the museum consists of two floors, on the ground floor, a statue of 'Airavata' (mythological white elephant who carries the Hindu god Indra) is placed, which was made in Mandvi in the 18th century. Highlights of the museum are the oldest collection of Kshatrapa inscriptions dating back to the 1st century, coins (including Kutch local currency 'Kori') and extinct Kutchi scripts. Address: Ghanshyam Nagar, Bhuj, Gujarat 370001 Timings: 10:00 AM to 1:00 AM & 2:30 PM to 5:30 PM, Closed on Wednesday and Public Holidays Attractions: Kshatrapa inscriptions, coins (including the kori, Kutch's local currency), embroidery, paintings, arms, musical instruments, sculpture and precious metalwork

Shyamji Krishna Memorial

Shyamji Krishna Memorial

Shyamji Krishna Memorial

The British ruled over India for over two hundred years. They ruthlessly exploited India’s economic resources and mercilessly oppressed the people. Many individuals took on the might of the British to free India. Shyamji Krishna Varma chose to take this fight to British soil and made London his base. Shyamji Krishna Varma was born on 4th October, 1857 in Mandvi town of Kutch district of Gujarat. He was one of the foremost freedom fighters in the history of the freedom movement of India with high sense of patriotism and selfless service for the nation. He had organized a revolutionary center in "India House" at London and propagated the cause of India’s independence through his writings in his publication journal called The "Indian Sociologist". Shyamji Krishna Varma was not alone in his work. He was joined by many other great radical Indian Nationalists who were committed to free their motherland from the yoke of British rule. Many great revolutionaries made the supreme sacrifice and laid down their lives to see their country free, both in India as well as abroad. The Memorial’s objective is to pay tribute to the contribution of Shyamji Krishna Varma and also to educate the young generation about those great Indians who sacrificed everything for the country’s freedom.

Jesal Toral Samadhi

Jesal Toral Samadhi

Jesal Toral Samadhi

To east of Ajepal’s monastery, is a small tiled shed with tombs of Muslim pattern sacred to Jesar or Jesal, a Jadeja, and Turi or Toral, a Kathi. The temple is locally known as Jesal Toral ni Samadhi, which literally means ‘the tomb of Jesal and Toral’. The shrine at Anjar is under the charge of the Ajepal monastery.

White Ran

White Ran

White Ran

A plethora of varied hues, profusion of design, superfluity of culture, cornucopia of music and dance, all together in the arid lands of Kutch creates a mosaic of exquisiteness which reflects the identity and spirit of the region. Kutch, one of the most ecologically and ethnically diverse district of the state is a celebratory land of art, crafts, music, dance, people and nature. During the full moon night of the winters amid the awe-inspiring and contrasting landscape each year a three day festive extravaganza brimming with hospitality, vigor and traditional flavor of the area is hosted and known as the Kutch or Rannutsav. This three to four day carnival organized at the various locales within Kutch takes one around the natural grandiose while introducing the visitor to the indigenous cultural and ethnical flavor of the people. Semi parched Grasslands of the Banni hosts the most magnificent display of vernacular architecture as the exhibition platform for the varied range of arts and crafts of the region. While an array of folk music and dance performances organized in the shimmering moonlit landscape provides the most enchanting experience. The colorful fairs held near the beach or the banks of a lake swings one with the spirit of festivity, fervor and flamboyancy while the organized tour around Kutch is an ideal occasion to be part of the region and experience the zeal and uniqueness of the people through a celebration of life

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

The first thing most people think of when they visit Mandvi is visiting the seashore. Mandvi Beach is the closest to the town center, across the bridge to the east side of the river, then down the road past a place called Salaya, accessed from just near the Kashi-Vishvanath Temple (sometimes the beach is called Kashi-Vishvanath Beach.) Wind Farm Beach is 7 km west of town, named for the windmills that line it to generate electricity for the area. You can get fresh coconuts and other snacks, swim in very pleasant water, and enjoy a nice view of the coastline. The Maharao's private beach, behind Vijay Vilas Palace, is 8 km from town, and requires a small fee (the other beaches are free and open to the public). More secluded than the others, the Vijay Vilas Beach has nice white sand, lovely places to swim and accommodation available in air-conditioned tents along the shore.

Kalo Dungar

Kalo Dungar

Kalo Dungar

Kalo Dungar alias black hill is the highest point of the Kutch region, offering the bird's-eye view of the Great Rann of Kutch. At only 462 meters, the hill itself is an easy climb and can be reached by either hopping in private taxi or Gujarat tourism buses. Dattatreya Temple, a 400-year-old shrine sacred to Lord Dattatreya is noticeable on the top of the hill. Many fables and tales are associated with the history of the Kalo Dungar, one of them say that Dattatreya, the three-headed incarnation of Lord Brahma, Lord Vishnu and Lord Shiva in the same body, stopped at this hill while walking on the earth. On the hills, he noticed many hungry jackals and offered them his body to eat. When jackals started eating Dattatreya's body, his body automatically regenerated. The practice of feeding jackals is still practiced by the people. Priest of the temple prepares food and serve it to jackals each morning and evening, after the aarti (Hindu religious ritual of worship). There is a bhojnalaya too that brings people from all walks of life to eat a meal together, free of cost. Being close to the Pakistan border, there is an army post at the top of the Kalo Dungar. People who want to see the Great Runn of Kutch from a different perspective should head up to Kalo Dungar.

Aina Mahal

Aina Mahal

Aina Mahal

Gleaming, glowing and shimmering, the Aina Mahal in Bhuj is one of the finest examples of Indo- Saracenic architecture constructed ever in India. This dreamy palace is the divine creation of Ramsinh Malam. The palace is unique and extraordinary in terms of interiors and architecture. Many water bodies and fountains are engulfed in the interiors of the palace, forming a variety of patterns that charms the viewers. Spread over two floors, the building features Darbar Hall, a hall of mirrors, and suites belonging to the various members of the royal family. The fabulous Aina Mahal is a part of the extravagant Darbargadh Palace of Bhuj. Content and the architecture of the palace are associated with the life story of its architect, Ramsinh Malam, who was rescued by the Dutch when he got shipwrecked at the East African Coast. Later, he was taken to Netherlands, where he mastered the art of tile making, enamelling, and clock making. Years later when Ramsinh came back to Kutch, the ruler of Kutch- Rao Lakha gave him an opportunity to display his skills. The Aina Mahal was thus ornamented with Venetian-style chandeliers, silver objects, clocks –all made locally under the Ramsinh’s supervision. Superb local craft like scroll paintings, jewelled swords, ivory inlaid doors, and paintings depicting processions are displayed in the palace. Museum is also a part of Aina Mahal. Exhibits displayed in the museum include paintings, photographs, royal possessions and finest samples of the Kutch embroidery. An exquisite collection of the museum also includes 15 m long scroll that depicts the Royal Procession of Maharao Shri Pragmalji Bahadur. The fort also holds a compound; a portion of the same is almost in ruins. With so many attractions to see, Aina Mahal is surely a significant heritage of the Kutch region. Address: Aaina Mahal, Ashapura Road, Hmirsher Likn, Bhuj, Gujarat, India Timing: 09:00 AM to 12 Noon & 03:00 PM to 06:00 PM, Thursday Closed

Prag Mahal

Prag Mahal

Prag Mahal

Next to Aina Mahal is the beautiful Prag Mahal, built in 1860's by the great designer Colonel Henry Saint Wilkins in the Italian Gothic style. The palace was commissioned by Maharaja Pragmalji II and has been a joint contribution of both Indian artisans and foreign workers. The entire palace is made from Italian marble and sandstone, the grand durbar hall with its classic statues and chandeliers are the highlights of the Prag Mahal. This exquisite property has its clock tower, the top of which offers the panoramic view of Bhuj. The Prag Mahal boasts of the second highest clock tower in India. A portion of the palace is converted into the museum, exhibiting several remnants and personal collection of royal family. In 2010, a part Prag Mahal was devastated due to the earthquake and the same is under renovation for quite a long time. The palace became immensely popular after part of the Bollywood blockbuster 'Lagaan' was shot here. Address: Old Dhatia Falia, Bhuj, Gujarat 370001 Timings: 9:00 AM to 12 Noon & 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM, Closed on Public Holidays

Vijay Palace

Vijay Palace

Vijay Palace

Close to the beach of Mandvi is Vijay Vilas Palace, an impressive Indo-Edwardian pile. This 20th- century summer palace was commissioned by Maharao Shri Khengarji III for his son Yuvraj Shri Vijayaraji, who was also the heir of his kingdom and is therefore named after him. Maharao Shri Khengarji III inherited the throne from his father, Maharaja Pargmalji II who built the Parag Mahal. Construction of the place was started off in 1920 and its structure reminds one of a large English country house. Made of red sandstones, the palace features every element of Rajput architecture and bears a striking resemblance to palaces of Orchha and Datia. Artisans from various parts of India, such as Rajasthan, Bengal and Saurashtra along with the Mistris and Suthars of Kutch were called upon for making of the palace, as a result of which traces of different religion aesthetics are reflected in the palace. Originally a summer abode for the Kutch rulers, its 1st floor is now the erstwhile royal family’s residence. The palace also has a private beach with luxury tents that can be rented out by the tourist. Since the palace has been well-preserved, it also used as a background for many Bollywood feature films. A portion of the palace is now converted into a resort, offering accommodation options with an ethnic decor and is replete with modern amenities. Inlaid tile work, distinctive stone carving, manicured garden, intricate jail work, magnificent water streams and murals are the highlights of the palace.

Hodka

Hodka

Hodka

Hodka village is believed to have been set up by the 'Halepotra' clan from Sindh who were cattle herders in search of pastures. The Meghwals, traditional leather craft and embroidery craftspersons, from further north, have also settled in Hodka over time. Discover the Great Rann of Kutch and live with its communities in Hodka's Village Resort, the Shaam-e-Sarhad (Sunset at the Border). It is owned and operated by the Village Tourism Committee of Hodka village. A rural yet incredible experience is certain at this resort with its majestic natural surroundings and warm hospitality from locals who feed you heartily, share their culture and showcase their craft.

Gandhi nu Gham

Gandhi nu Gham

Gandhi nu Gham

Ever since I was a kid, Mahatma Gandhi had always inspired me. It was hence quite a revelation when I visited this beautiful village called Gandhi Nu Gam. I wondered why it was called so. On asking the local guide, I was told that the 2001 earthquake had left this village devastated. The redevelopment of this entire village was carried out, re-creating everything bit by bit. While building the village again, the team took utmost care in keeping the village’s socio-cultural traditions intact. The project constructed 455 traditional bhungas together with three schools, a grass bank, community buildings, production centres, religious shrines, the electricity network and a water harvesting system. Sixty of these dwellings were on a new site situated centrally among the existing settlements in the area; the remaining dwellings were in the existing hamlets spread over a 10 km2 area. Each dwelling was provided with its own individual dual pit toilet system and a bathing cubical. Gandhi Nu Gam is a living example of sheer grit and determination that can preserve the past, as well as shape the future.

Bhujodi

Bhujodi

Bhujodi

A small town just 8 km southeast of Bhuj, Bhujodi is a major textile center of Kutch, with the vast majority of the 1200 inhabitants involved in textile handicraft production. Here you can meet weavers, tie-dye artists and block printers, most of whom belong to the Vankar community. Many will let you watch them work; just ask around. About a kilometer from Bhujodi is the Ashapura Crafts Park, set up by a corporate non-profit wing to help artisans display and sell their work and organizes dance and music events on weekends. Shrujan is a local non-profit set up 40 years ago to allow women to market their work better and earn a better living from it. The Shrujan campus is an interesting place to visit, with embroidery exhibits, a production center and excellent examples of local architecture with environmental awareness in mind

Mata no Madh

Mata no Madh

Mata no Madh

Ashapura Mata Temple, a 14th-century temple, is dedicated to the chief deity of Jadeja Rajputs, Ashapura Mata. The temple was commissioned under the rule of Jadeja dynasty and was constructed by two Karad Vanias- Ajo and Anagor. Ashapura Devi Maa, an incarnation of Annapoorna devi, is popular amongst her devotees as she fulfills desires and wishes of people who pray to her in need. In Gujarat, many other communities worship her as a kuldevi. Origin of the shrine is stepped in antiquity. One can see the references of Ashapura Devi Maa in the Puranas, Rudrayamal Tantra and so on which are all said to point to this shrine in Kutch. As such there are no ancient records that give any indications of the beginning of worship at this temple but it firmly stands out that the deity was very much there in the 9th century AD when Samma clan, Rajputs of Singh region, first entered the north-west Kutch. Later, more communities started following and eventually established them in the region. Over centuries, the temple has suffered severe damages due to earthquakes, first times in 1819 and the second time in 2001. The current structure of the temples is designed by two Brahmakshatriyas-Sundarji Shivji and Mehta Vallabhaji. Inside the temple, one can see a six feet high red-painted stone statue of Ashapura Mata. People of many communities gather at the temples for her ‘darshan’ all the year round, particularly during the ‘chaitra’, and in greater numbers during the ‘ashvin’ Navratri. During the festival, puja is performed on a large scale; everyone from erstwhile rulers to locals takes an active participation in the festival. Address: Matanamadh, Lakhapat, Gujarat State Highway 42, Kutch, Gujarat 370625

Lakhpat Gurudwara

Lakhpat Gurudwara

Lakhpat Gurudwara

Lakhpat has religious significance for three of India's most populous religions: Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism, reportedly camped here on his journey to Mecca. The site later became a gurudwara, which holds some of Nanak's possessions; Pir Ghaus Muhammed, a Sufi mystic who from the age of twelve devoted himself to spiritual practice and reportedly practiced half as a Hindu and half as a Muslim, is buried here in Lakhpat. His tomb is a stone construction with very complex carvings and a water tank that is said to have healing properties for skin problems; Sayyed Pir Shah's nine-domed mausoleum has intricate carvings, doors, windows and jaalis.

Narayan Sarowar

Narayan Sarowar

Narayan Sarowar

Narayan Sarovar, one of the holiest lakes of Hindus, is sacred to Lord Narayan, an incarnation of Lord Vishnu. Located 100 km away from Bhuj, the lake is an agglomeration of five lakes (collectively called Panch-Sarovar; Mansarovar, Bindu Sarovar, Narayan Sarovar, Pampa Sarovar and Pushkar Sarovar) and is considered a sacred pilgrimage destination for the orthodox Hindus. According to the Hindu mythology, the lake was formed when the foot of Lord Vishnu touched the land at a particular place and water spurted from there giving it the shape of a pious. A large number of temples like Shri Trikamraiji, Laxminarayan, Govardhannathji, Dwarkanath, Adinarayan, Ranchodraiji and Laxmiji, constructed by Maharaj Deshalji's queen surround the lake.

Indo Pak Border

Indo-Pak Border

Indo-Pak Border

A Border Security Force (BSF) All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) at the India-Pakistan border in the Rann of Kutch. ATVs are used by the BSF to traverse the marshy areas of the Rann, which get inundated by the nearby creeks and the Harami Nullah. Soldiers sit inside these ATVs and patrol the vast areas along the border. A Border Security Force (BSF) composite Border Outpost (BOP) along the India-Pakistan border in the Rann of Kutch. The BOPs have accomodations for the troops in the form of barracks, watch towers and facilities for recreational activities. They also comprise of facilities for operational purposes.

Fossil Park

Fossil Park

Fossil Park

At a distance of 55 km from Bhuj, Kutch Fossil Park is a museum located in the Haripar village of Gujarat. Situated near Dhinodhar hills, it is one of its kind museums in India and among the best places to visit in Bhuj. The Kutch Fossil Park was founded in the year 2002 by the visionary Mohan Sinh Sodha, the man who single- handedly worked and is continuously adding to the collection of the several fossils that are on display in the small 2 rooms' exhibition area. He has been doing this for almost 4 decades now since his first rendezvous with a fossil called Ammonite in the 70s. The discovery of that fossil changed his life and he went on to collect many of the fossils ranging from plants, fruits, gems, animals, reptiles etc. The most astounding fossil exhibited here is of the Dinosaur and its egg that has been collected over the time in bits and pieces and then restructured to give a good shape. Recently he found a Sea cow fossil, which was reconstructed with the help of the Roorke Institute of Technology. The species is now called Dommingia Sodhae in his honour! This park is located amidst the desert area, far from the city with absolutely eco-friendly surroundings. The gateway to the modest park is decorated with fossils of a tree and other beings and inside it is nice and charming as a picnic spot with good views of the area around. There is no entry fee here and the establishment runs purely on donations. Timings: 10 AM to 12 PM & 3 PM to 6 PM

Fossil Park

Mundra Port

Mundra Port

The Government of Gujarat and Adani group had joined hands in establishing Mundra port as a world-class commercial port through a joint Venture company called Adani Port & SEZ (earlier GAPL). A 632 m container wharf has been developed by M/s. Adani Container Terminal Ltd., and commenced the container handling from July, 2003. M/s MICTL is now operator of this container terminal. As a part of Phase-1 development, a total of 815 m long jetty with 4 multipurpose berths in 15 m water depths are constructed. A SBM to handle petroleum cargo / crude import for refinery of IOCL has been operational. The company has planned to implement Phase II development plan of Mundra port, which covers development of West port, South port and North port. Under Phase II development, about 26 berths and 3 SBMs will be developed, which will augment capacity of about 160 MMTPA to handle various types of cargo.